Alumni & Giving

The College of Nursing is committed to helping alumni feel connected to the exciting changes taking place on the UCF campus and throughout the Central Florida community. We are also committed to helping our alumni and friends play an active role in the growth of our nursing programs.

Our goal is to reach out to alumni and friends of the college, strengthen our relationship in the community and engage you—our generous supporters with the college’s faculty, staff and students.

We encourage you to get involved with your UCF family, and invest your time, talents and treasure in our college. It’s a great way to reunite with the UCF community, fellow alumni, friends, students and faculty members. We hope you will connect with the college today!

 

Career-related appointments for alumni can be scheduled using any of the following methods:

Services offered include career assessment and resume and cover letter critiques.

 

 

Development Contact

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Katie Korkosz, ‘04 & ‘06
Director of Development
College of Nursing
p: 407-823-1600
katiek@ucf.edu

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Alumni Relations Contact

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Kathleen Sakowicz, ‘12
Assistant Director of Alumni Engagement, College of Nursing
p: 407-823-2422
kathleen.sakowicz@ucf.edu

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Meet Martin Schiavenato, a 2007 alumnus of UCF's Nursing PhD programMartin Schiavenato: Using an orb to manage pain in babies
“I’ll never forget that baby. She lived a short life in excruciating pain. It was that encounter that inspired my research and decade-long quest to create a solution to manage pain in newborns.” Meet Martin Schiavenato, PhD alumnus and champion of babies who can’t verbalize their suffering.
 

Meet Martin Schiavenato, a 2007 alumnus of UCF's Nursing PhD program

Knight in Nursing: Martin Schiavenato

Champion of premature babies who can’t verbalize their suffering

“I’ll never forget that baby. As a NICU nurse, I was accustomed to caring for preemies. She was different – full-term and appeared so beautifully healthy. Unfortunately, she suffered from a genetic disorder that rendered her skin useless and every measure of comfort hurt her. She lived a short life in excruciating pain. It was that encounter that inspired my research and decade-long quest to create a solution to assess and manage pain in newborns.

It is not easy to remain focused and single minded for more than 10 years, but there is a significant motivating force to keep me going. Prematurity is not going away, and in fact now rising in the U.S. What I’m doing needs to be done.

After initially developing an orb-type device, inspired from a polygraph to measure nervous system responses, we went back to the proverbial ‘drawing board’ to design a new way to capture facial grimacing. Our solution is a new mouth sensor that we expect to complete by August 2017, and have received funding for the first ‘human demonstration’ project or device trial in the NICU immediately after.

To help bring this and other innovations to the bedside, where they’re needed, I’m launching a startup this May to house and commercialize three of our technological developments. As a nurse scientist with a passion for technology to evolve, UCF provided an opportunity for me to learn to collaborate with computer scientists and engineers. This is something that has remained a foundation to my current research and career.”


Martin Schiavenato, ’07PhD, RN
Alumnus of the UCF’s first Nursing PhD cohort,
Associate Professor, Washington State University (WSU) College of Nursing,
Affiliate Professor, WSU School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science,
Founder of the future startup, “Little Foot Innovation

Martin Schiavenato: Using an orb to manage pain in babies
Meet Martin Schiavenato, a 2007 alumnus of UCF's Nursing PhD program“I’ll never forget that baby. She lived a short life in excruciating pain. It was that encounter that inspired my research and decade-long quest to create a solution to manage pain in newborns.” Meet Martin Schiavenato, PhD alumnus and champion of babies who can’t verbalize their suffering.
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